Very Important Things Every User of Canonís D60 digital cameras you should knowWireless Creates a F

By: nagle


Nick Muskovac, PPSA Palm Harbor, FL wrote very interesting article about Canonís D60 digital camera. Individual experience and observation inspire his article.
1. D 60 Specifications

Author is active user of canon digital cameras. First one he had was Canon D 30. Comparing the canon D30 with D60 Mr. Muskovac finds than, the major difference is that the D60 has much more pixles - 6.3 million pixels which beats the D30 with 3.25 million pixels.He emphasis that D60 is using the CMOS which draws less power and therefore the camera can shoot more pictures on one battery than most Point-and-Shoot cameras without the loss of image quality.The major specifications in Mr. Muskovacx` are:
Type: Single Lens Reflex; 36 bit full color; CMOS direct imaging sensor
Compatible lenses: All Canon EF lenses
Lens focal length: 1.6 X indicated lens focal length
Imaging element: High sensitivity high resolution large single plate CMOS sensor
Effective sensor size: 22.7 X 15.1mm
Effective pixels: 6.29 million pixels (3072 X 2048)
Aspect ratio: 3:2
LCD monitor: TFT type color LCD monitor
Picture size: 1.8 inch
Recording method: Media--CF card (type I or II)
Formats: JPEG, RAW
Auto focus type--AF
Focusing points: 3 point (1 + 1)
AF working range: EV0.5 to EV18 (ISO 100)--This is a big improvement over the D30 with a range of EV2 to EV 18.
Focusing modes:
(1) One shot AF: AF locks when focus is achieved
(2) A1 servo AF: Tracks subject movement until the actual start of metering
(3) A1 focus AF: Automatically switches between one-shot AF mode and A1 servo AF.
(4) Manual focus: Manual focusing can be used when focusing mode switch on lens is set to manual focus (M)
Exposure control: 35-zone SPC and TTL open Metering
(1) Evaluative metering
(2) Center partial metering (approx. 9.5% of viewfinder area)
(3) Center weighted average value metering
Exposure modes:
(1) tv (time value) Shutter speed priority
(2) av (aperture value) Aperture-priority
(3) Auto depth of field priority
(4) Full Auto mode
(5) Manual mode
ISO speed range: Equivalent to 100, 200, 400, 800, 1000
Exposure compensation:
(1) AEB +/- 2 stops in 1/2 or 1/3 stop increments.
(2) Manual compensation +/- 2 stops in 1/2 or 1/3 stop increments.
Shutter type: Vertical travel focal plane shutter with all speeds controlled electronically.
Speeds: 1/4000 to 30 seconds. Bulb, and X-sync at 1/200 second.
Self-Timer: Electronically controlled, 10-second delay.
Drive modes:
(1) Single shot
(2) Continuous
(3) Self-timer (10 sec)
Number of continuous images:
Approximately 3 images/second; In One Shot AF mode at 1/250 second or faster, to a maximum of 8 images.
Built-in flash type:
Retractable E-TTL autoflash and auto popup flash.
Guide No. 39 at ISO 100 (ft.)
Recycling time: approximately 3 seconds.
Power Supply: operates from one BP-511 Battery Pack (lithium ion battery)
Number of images that can be taken with a fully charged battery:
540 (50% flash, normal temp.)
Camera Body
Flash contacts:
(1) Accessory shoe: X-sync contacts
(2) Sync terminal (with locking thread) on lower corner of camera body.
External flash system compatibility: Compatible with E-TTL auto sync.
In his opinion, the D60 camera's most valuable specification and feature is, that it will take all of Canon's EF (auto focus) lenses.
This was a very important consideration for him since he already owns Canon EOS equipment and the following EF lenses:
20mm 2.8 28-135 IS 4.5/5.6
100mm 2.8 macro 75-300 IS 5.6
70-200mm2.8 100-400 IS 5.6 300mm 2.8

2. D 60 canon in action
Putting the camera in action he took few shots and analyzed the quality of the pictures. He used the Canon 100mm 2.8 macro lens. Then he explains "Its focal length is 160 mm when mounted on the D60, an ideal macro lens. I use a twin macro flash, which I have been using for years with my EOS 1N. I shoot in the manual mode with this flash, using the guide number to gauge the distance. The shutter speed of the camera is set to 1/200 sec. I vary the f-stop depending on the distance of the butterfly from the imaginary film plane. The f-stop is generally varied between f16 and f25. When the distance to the subject exceeds 1 1/2 feet, I change the ISO setting from ISO100 to ISO200 instead of opening up the aperture. In this manner I could still use a small aperture value and maintain a good depth of field. With the D60 and 6.3 million pixels, I was able to make a very good 10 X 15 inch print using the largest jpeg image storage mode. Figure 1 shows a Coolie Butterfly taken at ISO200, 1/200 sec, f22, and a distance of about 2 feet".
When he used evaluative metering on the snowy egrets against a green background, the egrets were overexposed. Then he concludes that "the same is true to a lesser extent when using Center Partial Metering and Center Weighted Average. To get the proper exposure on the White Egrets, an exposure compensation of -2/3 to -1 stop was used in the evaluative metering mode. I shoot most all my pictures using the evaluative metering mode".
He pays attention to file numbering systems. We may choose from (1) Continuous. (2) Auto reset. In the Continuous mode the numbering is continuous between cards. Then he points that Canon software assigns the folder numbers. The image number in each successive folder picks up where the previous folder left off, thereby providing consecutive numbering of images. The time/date is also permanently stored with each image file. Convenient storage functions allow to place Images in folders in groups of 100.

3. Another important features
According to the author following features of the D60 that I consider important:
1. D60 can use all Canon EF lenses.
2. Changing ISO settings in mid-roll.
3. Review your picture: immediately after making the exposure.
4. Having a built in 1.6 X extender.
5. Shooting 3 images per second and up to eight continuous images

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. Another important features According to the author following features of the D60 that I consider important: 1. D60 can use all Canon EF lenses. 2. Changing ISO settings in mid-roll. 3. Review your picture: immediately after making the exposure. 4. Having a built in 1.6 X extender. 5. Shooting 3 images per second and up to eight continuous images

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