Questions You Need to Ask About Computer Security

By: The Internet Safety Advocate


Security technology is only a part of an overall security plan. If you own a small business or a home-based business, or if you've been tasked with implementing security at your organization, developing a comprehensive security plan should be a very important part of your overall security strategy. Get the information you need to get started on the right track! In the computer/internet security game, the best move is one of Prevention! Prevention! Prevention!

!b> With that in mind, here are the twelve questions you need to be asking, or, at least, be thinking about if you're serious about preventing or stopping security risks, threats, and attacks:

1. Do I have a solid security policy or strategy?
If you don't, begin immediately to get sample security plans, policies, and best practices for your business and/or home.

2. Where would I go for key information and news on keeping your information private?
Search the internet for managed security services. Ask if they provide a free computer test to assess your pc's level of vulnerability. Ask if they provide the latest tips to keep your privacy and protect your personal information and that of your business. Or simply - ask me.

3. Does my disaster recovery plan include redundant back-up and data recovery systems?
Understand what a good data back up system is and how to best recover from a disaster.

4. Do I know how to create safe passwords?
Learn how to write virtually un-crackable passwords.

5. How do I train my employees or family members to be secure?
Get all leading research on what to teach about security.

6. What do I do if my employees are my biggest security risk?
Learn all about social engineering and insider hacking.

7. What or who is a hacker?
A person who uses and/or creates software technology to break into the computers of individuals, businesses, government, and organizations for personal gain is known as a hacker. Often after he, she, or they hack into a computer, they can control it secretly by remote, making it a "zombie computer".

8. How does he (or she or they) break into home and business computers?
If they don't have the break-in software, they can buy it off the black market, or create it, themselves. With this technology, they use their malicious software to look for holes in the computers of their targeted victims.

9. To what extent might my home or business computers be vulnerable to hackers, hacker's tools, viruses, etc.?
You will never know unless you take the time to test your computer to see what holes are open, by what back doors (up to 65,000 portals) are malware entering your computer.

10. What is "drive-by hacking"?
Because wireless Internet access points have become popular for homes and businesses, home and business computers have now become a major target for hackers. In this new phenomenon, called "dive-by hacking", hackers simply take their laptop computers in their cars and drive through business parks or residential neighborhoods remotely scanning for open wireless networks.

11. Would I know if someone tries to hack into my computer?
Depending on the security measures you have on your computer and the sophistication of the hacker's software program, you might or might not be aware. Using keylogging programs, these cybercriminals can secretly see and record every keystroke you enter on your computer, thereby gaining access to all your private and personal information.

12. I have all the security measures, anti-virus, anti-spyware, and firewall I need. Can I still be hit by hackers and other pc-disabling attacks, risks, and threats?

Again, depending on the security measures you have on your computer and the sophistication of the hacker's software program, your computer or computers might or might not be compromised. Remember: Cybercriminals are superintelligent criminals! They somehow always seem to stay one step ahead of authorities and anti-cybercriminal software.

Obviously if you have to ask these questions, then you need to take immediate steps to plug the holes and cover the gaps.

So, here are some steps you can take immediately to implement, increase, or improve your present security measures:

* Learn all you can about hackers and the tools and methods they use to invade your privacy and cause problems. Subscribe to a comprehensive source of Internet security research, news and information for small and mid-sized businesses and organizations, or other professionals, that want to increase their level of security and build on their current technologies and efforts.

* Take advantage of the research already done. Get access to information about the leading topics in the security field, including hackers and hacker tools, viruses, data back up, writing good passwords, government and legal issues, protecting from insider hacking - and more.

* Stay current with important security news developments. Work with a managed security firm that maintains an entire library of the most beneficial news articles, white papers and other links that you can use to maintain an excellent awareness of cyber-security issues on an ongoing basis.

* Need help creating a security plan for your organization or business? Take advantage of professional security consulting and training both by telephone consulting or on-site visits. Get vulnerability assessments, employees training, security implementation, and much more.

Because cyberpredators and other cybercriminals are becoming smarter and more sophisticated in their operations, they are real threats to your personal security and privacy. Your money, your computer, your family, and your business are all at risk.

These cybercriminals leave you with three choices :

1. Do nothing and hope their attacks, risks, and threats donít occur on your computer.

2. Do research and get training to protect yourself, your family, and your business.

3. Get professional help to lockdown your system from all their attacks, risks, and threats.

Remember: When you say "No!" to hackers and spyware, everyone wins! When you don't, we all lose!

© MMVII, Etienne A. Gibbs, MSW, The Internet Safety Advocate and Educator

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Resources Box: Etienne A. Gibbs, Independent Internet Security Advocate and Educator, consults with individuals, small business owners, and home-business entrepreneurs regarding online protection against spyware, viruses, malware, hackers, and other pc-disabling cybercrimes. For more information, visit www.SayNotoHackersandSpyware.com/.

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