Global Water- Addressing Water Shortages In Guatemala

By: Vineesh Sandhir


In recent years, Global Water has funded multiple projects each year in Guatemala.

These completed projects include the following –

Healthy Schools Program
This is a wonderful program in Guatemala run by the Appropriate Technology Program in the
Peace Corps. During a Healthy Schools project, an “Appropriate Technology” Peace Corps volunteer works with a group of schools to help them build health-related facilities. These facilities include: water systems, latrines, kitchen facilities, and hand-washing stations (called lavamanos).
Once the necessary health-related facilities are installed and being used, the schools become
eligible to be recognized as a “healthy school” by the Guatemalan government agency that
builds and maintains schools. (hence, the Program’s name). The final activity that must be accomplished by the school is implementing an educational program to teach students how and why to use hygiene-related facilities.
As you can probably imagine, it’s quite an accomplishment for a school to be recognized by the Guatemalan Education Agency and so having a “healthy school” in a village is a significant point of pride for the village, as well as the students and teachers of the school.
Global Water funds a variety of projects within the Healthy Schools Program each year throughout Guatemala in partnership with the Peace Corps and local NGOs. Progress Reports from this program can be found under Progress Reports on the Global Water website.
The Panimachavac Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of Panimachavac, located in the Department of Chimaltenago, Guatemala. There are 43 families living in the village with a total population of about 190 people.

The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a 10 cubic meter (2,600 gallons) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line measuring four kilometers (2.5 miles). An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to household faucets installed at each individual home site.
The Caton Vi’qola Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of Caton Vi’qola, in the Department of El Quiche, Guatemala and located about nine kilometers (5.5 miles) northeast of the city of Nebaj in the Cuchumantane Mountains of the Guatemalan Central Highlands.

There are 22 families living in the village with a total population of about 110 people. The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, a 5 cubic meter (1,300 gallons) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line measuring 1.6 kilometers (1 mile). An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to household faucets installed at each individual home site.
The San Francisco Javier Project was a gravity-flow water supply and distribution system for the rural village of San Francisco Javier, located in the Department of El Quiche, Guatemala. The village is located 30 kilometers northwest of Nebaj, in the Cuchumantane Mountains of the Guatemalan Central Highlands.

There are 60 families living in the village with a total population of about 300 people. The system included a spring capture box, break pressure tanks, two 5 cubic meter (each 1,300 gallonsl) storage / distribution tank located just above the village and a main gravity-flow transport line measuring four kilometers (2.5 miles). An additional piping system distributed water from the storage tank to household faucets installed at each individual home site.

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GLOBAL WATER was founded in 1982 by former U.S. Ambassador John McDonald and Dr. Peter Bourne to help save the lives of people in developing countries that are lost due to unclean water. For more information, please visit globalwater.org

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