7 Effective Ways to Improve Your Credit Score

By: Pnreddy


There are many misconceptions about credit scores out there. There are customers who believe that they donít have a credit score and many customers who think that their credit scores just donít really matter. These sorts of misconceptions can hurt your chances at some jobs, at good interest rates, and even your chances of getting some apartments.

The truth is, of you have a bank account and bills, then you have a credit score, and your credit score matters more than you might think. Your credit score may be called many things, including a credit risk rating, a FICO score, a credit rating, a FICO rating, or a credit risk score. All these terms refer to the same thing: the three-digit number that lets lenders get an idea of how likely you are to repay your bills.

1. Understand where credit scores come from.

If you are going to improve your credit score, then logic has it that you must understand what your credit score is and how it works. Without this information, you wonít be able to very effectively improve your score because you wonít understand how the things you do in daily life affect your score.

In general, your credit score is a number that lets lenders know how much of a credit risk you are. The credit score is a number, usually between 300 and 850, that lets lenders know how well you are paying off your debts and how much of a credit risk you are.

Similarly, credit bureaus and lenders often look at general patterns. Since people with too many debts tend not to have great rates of repayment, your credit score may suffer if you have too many debts.

2. Pay your bills on time.

One of the best ways to improve your credit score is simply to pay your bills on time. This is absurdly simple but it works very well, because nothing shows lenders that you take debts seriously as much as a history of paying promptly. Experts think that up to 35% of your credit score is based on your paying of bills on time, so this simple step is one of the easiest ways to boost your credit score.

3. Avoid excessive credit.

If you have many lines of credit or several huge debts, you make a worse credit risk because you are close to ďoverextending your credit.Ē This simply means that you may be taking on more credit than you can comfortably pay off. Even if you are making payments regularly now on existing bills, lenders know that you will have a harder time paying off your bills if your debt load grows too much.

The higher your debts the greater your monthly debt payments and so the higher the risk that you will eventually be able to repay your debts. In order to have a great credit score, avoid taking out excessive credit. You should stick to one or two credit cards and one or two other major debts (car loan, mortgage) in order to have the best credit rating.

4. Pay down Your Debts.

If you have a lot of debt, your credit score will suffer. Paying down your debts to a minimum will help elevate your credit score. If you are serious about improving your credit score, then start with the largest debt you have and start paying it down so that you are using a less large percentage of your credit total.

In general, try to make sure that you use no more than 50% of your credit. If possible, reduce the debt even more. If you can pay off your credit card in full each month; that is even better. What counts here is what percentage of your total credit limit you are using - the lower the better.

5. Have a range of credit types.

The types of credit you have are a factor in calculating your credit score. In general, lenders like to see that you are able to handle a range of credit types well. Having some form of personal credit - such as credit cards - and some larger types of credit - such as a mortgage or auto loan - and paying them off regularly is better than having only one type of credit.

6. Beware of debts and credit you donít use.

Having credit lines and credit cards you donít need makes you seem like a worse credit risk because you run the risk of ďoverextendingĒ your credit. Also, having lots of accounts you donít use increases the odds that you will forget about an old account and stop making payments on it - resulting in a lowered credit score. Having fewer accounts will make it easier for you to keep track of your debts and will increase the chances of you having a good credit score.

7. Check your credit score regularly

You are more likely to notice problems and inconsistencies if you check your credit score on a regular basis - at least once a year and preferably three times a year. Be sure to check your credit rating with each credit bureau, too. If you notice anything odd or anything you donít recognize (such as a charge account you did not open) report it immediately.

Sometimes, these errors are caused by mistakes made at the credit bureau, but they could be an indication that someone is using your identity. In either case, such mistakes could hurt your credit score. Fixing such errors improves your credit score.

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Find out more tips to repair bad credit and raise your credit score. Information various credit repair resources such as library, credit bureaus, etc. Get more information by visiting Improve Your Credit Score

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